Hoby Church Glebe Terrier 1730

Hoby Church Glebe Terrier

Hoby Church Glebe Terrier

A glebe terrier is a term specific to the Church of England. It is a document, usually a written survey or inventory, which gives details of glebe, lands and property in the parish owned by the Church of England and held by a clergyman as part of the endowment of his benefice, and which provided the means by which the incumbent (rector, vicar or perpetual curate) could support himself and his church. Typically, glebe would comprise the vicarage or rectory, fields and the church building itself, its contents and its graveyard. If there was an absentee rector the glebe would usually be divided into rectorial glebe and the rest. “Terrier” is derived from the Latin terra, “earth”.

The glebe terrier would be drawn up at the time of each visitation, an official visit usually by the archdeacon. The Archdeacon would visit each parish annually, and the bishop visited outlying parts of his diocese every few years to maintain ecclesiastical authority and conduct confirmations.

Each church was entitled to a house and glebe. The glebe lands were either cultivated by the clergyman himself, or by tenants to whom he leased the land. In those cases where the parsonage was not well-endowed with glebe, the clergyman’s main source of income would come from the tithes.

Glebe terriers are useful historical documents as they may contain the names of tenants and the holders of adjoining lands. As the open field system comprised many narrow strips, often isolated from each other, within the larger fields, the terrier can provide useful information on the strips and furlongs in the parish. They may also contain information on how income from tithes was calculated and collected.

Full lists of the holdings of each parish were first required in 1571. They vary greatly as the compilation of the survey was undertaken by and at the discretion of each individual clergyman. The surveys were then collected together in the Church of England Registries, but a copy was often kept in the parish. Many are now kept in county record offices.

Components

An ideal glebe terrier would comprise:

  • The church and churchyard
    • a list of everything in the church itself, including its fabric, furniture, plate, bells and books.
    • the churchyard with special notes about customary obligations to repair walls or fences.
  • The parsonage
    • a detailed description of the parsonage with its curtilage, a statement of how much of it is brick, wattle and daub, thatch, tile, plaster etc.
  • Other properties
    • A detailed description of other buildings in the parish owned by the Church of England, and of the rents charged
  • Glebe land
    • the amount of glebe which belonged to the benefice, often in yardlands, ploughlands or oxgangs, with all the abuttals and boundaries named.
    • how much meadow accompanied the ploughland and the method by which this meadow was re-allotted, usually annually.
    • how many cow-, horse- or sheep-gates were attached to the benefice and exercisable upon the common.
  • Tithe revenue
    • description of the tithe revenue of the benefice, with details of tithe-free land and the customary arrangements as to the collection of tithe, or the payments in lieu of tithe.
  • Use of the parish
    • notes regarding the use of the parish during Easter offerings, and mortuaries, surplice fees and other customary payments.
  • Income and fees
    • a list of fees which the parish clerk could charge for such things as burial, funeral sermon, breaking the ground, marriage and tolling the bell. These fees were used to maintain the clerk, and the church clock.

A note from Dr Pam Fisher, Leicestershire Victoria County History Trust

It’s nice to find a parish which still has their own copy of a glebe terrier, and it’s a very interesting document. By 1730 they were becoming much more detailed, but it’s quite unusual to see tithe customs explained in so much detail within a terrier, and you are lucky that the one to survive in the parish shows ‘New Fields’ (and interesting that these did not pay tithes in kind) and dated changes to the parsonage. It would be fascinating to compare this with the earlier terriers which survive for Hoby at Lincoln and possibly also at Wigston.

Hoby Church Glebe Terrier

Hoby Church Glebe Terrier

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Hoby Church Glebe Terrier

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Hoby Church Glebe Terrier

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Hoby Church Glebe Terrier

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 Hoby in Leicestershire Terrier 1730 – transcribed by Caroline Ellis 2014

A Terrar of the Parsonage House, Outhouses, Glebelands, of all Commons and Common of Pasture and Tithes belonging to the Rector of Hoby together with the Easter and other Dues belonging to the Rector, Clerk and Sexton. Also an Account of the Bells, Surplice and other furniture belonging to the Church (ac.?) taken and made the nineteenth day of August 1730 by Robert Brown Rector, James Pick and William Beby Church-Wardens and other Inhabitants of the said Parish of Hoby.

The Parsonage House

The Parsonage House was entirely new built with Brick and covered with blew slate in 1703 at the sole expense of Richard Cox Master of Arts the then Rector. In it there is an Entry, a Kitchen, a Dishhouse, a Pantry, a Hall, a little and a great Parlour, which little and great parlours have Cellars under them. Two stair Cases, five Chambers and six Garrets. At a little distance from the house there is a Brewhouse with a little Room adjoining to it. This is all built with Brick and covered with blew slate. The Brewhouse and little Room are chambered. Over the little Room is a Pigeon Chamber; over the Brewhouse is a Chamber for Corn and two Garners for Malt. The first storey of the Parsonage house is all paved with Brick except the Hall, the great Parlour and bottom of the great Staircase. The great Parlour is boarded with elm and oak, the Hall and bottom of the best staircase are paved with square tile. Four chambers are boarded with deal. The top of the best staircase and the second storey of the little staircase are boarded with elm and oak. The Hall Chamber is plastered and matted. All the Garrets are plastered. The Brewhouse is paved with Brick. The little room is not paved at all. The two chambers are plastered. The Staircase that leads to the two Chambers is made of wood. There are likewise in the little Parlour in the Parsonage house two little closets, a little closet under the best Staircase, a little closet in the Kitchen Chamber, and a little Closet in the Chamber over the little Parlour.

The Out Houses

Two Stables new built with Brick and slated 1727 containing three bays. One little Barn three bays. Another Barn called the Tithe Barn five bays, about half of which was new built with Brick 1724. Another Barn formerly a Kiln two bays. These are built with Wood Laths and Clay and covered with straw.

 Tithes

All the Lands pay Tithe in Kind to the Rector except some Grounds called the New Fields for which he receives a Rate Tithe of twelve pounds per annum payable at two times in the year viz. at Lady Day and at Michaelmas by even and equal portions. The Rector receives all Tithes of Orchards and Gardens and of everything that is titheable in a Parish except which is excepted in the Terrar. He receives only a penny a Garden.

How the Tithes are Paid

In the Meadows the Rector has of every piece the Tenth Pole except in the Meadows called the Holm where the following pieces are tithed by the Cock: viz. one piece lying by the riverside belonging to Thomas March Miller, another piece belonging to Michael Bonner’s widow and a third piece belonging to Mary Wait Widow except also one Row in the Meadow called Baincroft lying at the upper end of the said meadow next to the River, belonging to William Beby.
All sorts of corn are tithed by the Cock. All the Hay that does arise in the Common Fields and Elsewhere as in the Holmsteads all are likewise titheable by the Cock, except that part called the Great Breants, the Breant Bottom, the Dinge and the Furlong lying under that Headland called the long Headland.

Tithe Wool and Lamb

If the Sheep are put into the Field before Candlemass Day the Rector has the Tenth fleece paid after the following manner: viz Ten fleeces are laid upon a Table or elsewhere, the Owner chooses two and the Rector the third. If they are put in after Candlemass, the Rector has only a Groat a score for each Month till they are shorn; for the Sheep that die he has the tenth Pelt.
The Rector has the tenth Lamb. If he has one in sevin he pays a penny half penny for it. They are taken from the Ewes the next day after Holy Thursday. Ten are put in a place, the Owner chooses two, the Rector the third.

Mares and Colts etc

For every Mare and Colt the Rector has two pence, for a new milked Cow two pence, for a strapper a penny, for a calf that is killed or reared by the owner a half penny if all or part of it be sold the tenth penny. If a sow brings seven piggs the Rector has one, if she brings ten the Rector does not reckon on from seven, but if she brings above ten then he reckons on, if she brings under seven they are to be numbered with the next litter of Piggs the Owner has.

Chickens and Eggs

The Rector has the tenth Chick. For a Cock he has foer, for a Hen two Eggs.

Commons

The Rector has ten Cow Commons and four score Sheep Commons. For Horses there is no (limit?).

 Surplices, Fees and Easter Dues

Every Farmer or Husbandman pays for himself and Wife seven pence, for the Children that have received the Communion a penny each.

Every other Inhabitant pays two pence for himself and Wife and a penny for every child that has received the Communion. For a Churching sixpence, a marriage by Banns two shillings and sixpence, by Licence five shillings, if Mortuary a (fee?) of ten shillings is paid for everyone ….that dies worth forty pounds.
The Rector pays to the Bishop at his Visitation for Procurations five shillings, to the Archdeacon of Leicester for Procurations seven shillings and sixpence half penny farthing, for synodals three shillings and sixpence.

The Furniture of the Church. Repairs etc.

One Communion Carpet made of Stuff, four Bells, a Clock, a Common Prayer Book and Bible, the Canons and Homilies, a Surplice, a Pulpit Cushion, a Small Silver Cup about five ounces, a Pewter Flagon, a Damask Communion Cloth and Napkin of the same. The Parishioners and those that rent lands in the Parish repair the Church, find Communion Bread and Wine and other Utensils (such) as a Common Prayer Book for both Rector and Clerk, a Bible, Surplice and so forth. The Rector repairs the Chancel. The Churchyard Fence that is built with stone is maintained by the Husbandmen, the garden by those who rent Lands in the Parish, that which is built with Clay by Robert Henton, that which is near the Parsonage House and is built with Brick by the Rector.

The Sexton’s and Clerk’s Wages

The Church Wardens pay the sexton one pound per annum for looking after the Clock and ringing the Great Bell, at four in the morning and eight at night from Michaelmas to Lady Day.
The Clerk has three sheaves of Rye for every yardland and proportionately of those who have not a yard land. This is paid him as soon as it is reaped and garnered. He has a Household loaf every Quarter of every Farmer. Every other House pays him four pence at every Easter.

The Glebe. Meadow Ground in West End

In the Meadow called the Westends there are six pieces of Meadow containing by estimation four Oxgang a piece. An Oxgang is computed half a yardland. They never alter as in some other places they do, but are always mated in one place Thomas Henton junior on one side, sometimes William Henton sometimes Thomas Henton senior on the other.
Two Lays called the long lays, half an Acre. William Henton on the West, Thomas Henton senior on the East.

In the Meadow called Baincroft

Two Lays containing two Roods. William Henton on the south Thomas Henton junior on the north side.

In the Meadow called Austrean

Four Oxgangs in every Twelves. These are changeable but always in the Twelves Austrean being divided into Twelves, Sixteens and the Hall pieces.
Two little (Hades?) more near the stone Bridge between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior.

In the Meadow called Moorsbeck

Three Twelves containing four Ox gangs approx., sometimes William Henton, sometimes Thomas Henton senior on one side and Thomas Henton junior always on the other side, these do not change.
Five Hades and a half. The two northernmost Hades lie between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior, the next Hade between James Pick and William Henton.
A Hade (uncultivated slope or baulk) and Selion? (single strip) belonging to the Gorse Piece between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior, a Hade between James Pick and Thomas March.

In the Meadow called East Morens

Four Ox gangs. Thomas Henton junior on the South, John Hubbard weaver on the North.

Grass Ground in the Common Fields

In the Sand Field next the Austrean Meadow four Lays near little June ford between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior about four roods. One short lay butting into Melton Gate between the said two Hentons, about a quarter of a rood. One lay near Austrean meadow between William Henton and Thomas March Miller about a Rood.
One lay William Henton always on one side, sometimes Thomas March sometimes Thomas Henton some? On the other almost a rood.
One Lay butting to Austrean Meadow between the said Hentons, a Rood.
One lay more in the same furlong between the said Hentons a Rood.
One Lay upon the Long Stones between the said Hentons, a Rood.
Two Lays upon Short Stones between the said Hentons, almost a Rood.
One Lay near Melton Gate, Thomas Henton junior South, William James North, a Rood.
Two broad Lays on Salters Wong between the said Hentons, an Acre.
One Lay jutting to Alderson’s Close William Henton on the West, Thomas March on the East, a Rood.
One Lay on the top of Fulwell Mires. Thomas March North.
One Lay next to Priest Baulk, Half a Rood.
Three Priests Baulks lying about Shouldby Gate jutting to Alderson Close.
Two Lays butting into Moorbeck between the said Hentons, two Roods.
One Lay near little June ditch butting up to the town Hole, James Pick on both sides, a Rood.

Grass Ground in the Sand Field near to the New Field.

Two Lays at the bottom of Bonners Lane between the said Hentons. About a Rood and a half.
One broad Lay on Sandpit Hill between the said Hentons. Half an acre.
One broad Lay on the bottom of Sandpit Hill. A Rood. Between William.Henton and William Beby.
One Lay butting into Bott Hole between the said Hentons. Half aRood.
One Lay near the short Dowls between the said Hentons. Half a Rood.
Two Lays butting near Stringham Ford between the said Hentons. Half an acre.
One Piece of Parting Grass containing two yardlands lying next to Thomas Henton senior and William Beby.
One broad Lay on the Mill Lays between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior. Half an Acre.
One narrow lay on the Mill Lays William James East a Rood.
One broad Lay butting up to Millers Stile between Wlliam James and Thomas Henton Junior half an Acre.

Grass Ground in the Clay Fields next to the New Fields

Two little Lays next the Lengths. Scarce a Rood. A Mistake
One Lay next the Drain at the bottom of the Nether Pease lands between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior. A Rood.
One broad Lay near Bessons Close nook between William James and Thomas Henton junior. A good Rood.
One broad Lay on the top of Brier Wong between William Henton and James Pick. A Rood.
One little lay butting against the lands that go up to the long Headlands. William Beby North. William Henton South. A Rood.
Two lays next to the Nether Pease Lands between the Hentons. A Rood.
One Lay more at the bottom of the lands that go up to the long Headlands. Between the two Hentons. A small Rood.
One Lay near the Breant Bottom. William Henton on both sides. A Rood.
The fourth part of three Lays on the top of Brewsters Close between William Henton and William Beby.
An equal share of Parting Grass with James Pick and William Beby upon the Cheesecake.

 Grass Ground in the Middle Field

One Lay in the Breant Bottom in between Thomas Henton junior and William James. A Rood.
One lay on the Great Breants. William Beby South. A Rood
One Lay more on the same furlong between the Hentons. A little Rood.
One Lay butting up to Ragdale Barley Field between William James and William Beby. A Rood.
One broad Lay in the Lings between William Henton and William James. A Rood.
One broad Lay upon Butcher Wong between William Beby and Thomas Henton Senior one old Rood.
Better half of the Shrubs on the top of the three lands belonging to William Henton near Ragdale. James Pick has the other half.

Goss Lays

One lay going up to the Cottagers close nook between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior. Half an Acre.
Two Lays butting into Shouldby Way between the said two Hentons. Half an Acre.
One broad Lay in the Foxhole next William Henton. Half an Acre.
Half a lay butting into Moorsbeck southward to Thomas Henton. Half a Rood.
Two Lays more on the same Furlong between ye said Hentons. Two Roods.

Ploughed Lands in the Sand Field next to the New Fields

One Land with the Hade next to New Field Hedge. Two Roods.
One Land butting up to William James’s Headland with the Hade between William James and James Pick. Half an Acre.
One broad Land with the Hade against the Butts ( a triangular bit of land between furlongs, also cultivated). Thomas Henton junior North, William Henton south. Half an Acre.
Two lands Butting into Foxley Gate between the said Hentons. Half a Rood.
Two Lands more with two Hades butting into Foxley Gate between the said Hentons. A Rood and half.

Arable Lands in the Clay Fields next to the New Fields

One broad land near the Parson’s Close between Thomas Henton junior and James Pick. Half an Acre.
One broad Land in the same furlong the Parson’s Close. William James on both sides. Half an acre.
One land more near Woodgate between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior. Three Roods.
A Wong (enclosure) called by the name of Priest’s Wong containing by estimation t…four Acres with Hades belonging to it.
One land on the Top of the Wong near the hedge between Thomas Henton junior and James Pick a Rood.
One land on the top of the Wong between James Pick and William Beby. A Rood.
One land butting on to Priest’s Wong Headland between Thomas Henton junior and William Henton. A Rood.
Two lands on the small furlong now plowed together between the said Hentons. Two Roods.
A three Rood land on the same furlong with a Hade at the end of it between William Beby and William Henton.
Two lands near to Breants Pool or in the Harepits with Hades, between William Henton and Thomas junior. Two Roods.

Arable Lands in the Peartree Furlong

One land next to Thomas Henton junior by Headland. A Rood.
One land more in the same furlong, William Henton on both sides. A Rood.
One broad land on Willows Furlong with Hades at both ends between William and Thomas Henton junior. Three Roods.
One (ow?) land on Willows furlong between William Henton and William Beby. A Rood.
One land more on the same furlong between Thomas Henton junior and William Beby. Half an acre.
One land more in the same furlong between Thomas Henton junior and William Bate half an acre.
One short land more in the same furlong between Thomas Henton junior and William Henton. Half a Rood.
Two lands on the hanging furlong next to the hanging lays between Thomas Henton junior and William Henton. Two Roods.
One land in the Nether Pease lands, William Henton on both sides. A Rood.
One land near the lengths between James Pick and William James with a Hade at both ends. Half a Rood.
One land on Briar Wong, William James on both sides. Half a Rood.
One land in the same furlong between William Henton and Thomas March. Half a Rood.
One land on the top of Brier Wong between Thomas Henton Junior and William Henton a Rood.
One land in the Glapings between the said Hentons a rood.
Two lands butting up to the Long Headland between the said Hentons three Roods.
One land in the same furlong between William Beby and James Pick a good Half Rood.
One broad land butting into Dairynook between William Henton and Thomas Henton Senior. A Rood.

Arable Lands in the Middle Clay Fields

Two lands butting on to Broad Plat near the Townside between Thomas Henton junior and William Henton. Two Roods.
One land in the same furlong between William Beby and Thomas Henton senior. A Rood.
One other land between Thomas Henton junior and William James. A Rood.
One land near Brock Gate between Thomas Henton junior and William James. A Rood.
Two lands in the same furlong between James Pick and Thomas Henton junior a Rood.
One little land South to William James. A Rood.
One broad land between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior. Half an Acre.
One narrow land. A Rood. James Pick on both sides.
One broad land between the said Hentons. Half an Acre.
Another broad land beween the said Hentons. Half an Acre.
Two narrow lands between the said Hentons. A Rood…All in the same furlong.
One broad land butting down into the narrow Sick and into Brock Gate between the said Hentons. Half an Acre.
One land more in the same furlong between Thomas Henton Junior and James Pick.
One land more between James Pick and Mary Smith. Half an Acre.
Two lands butting into the narrow Sick near Ragdale between Thomas Henton junior and James Pick. Two Roods.
Two lands in Coppice Nook between Thomas Henton junior and William James. Two Roods.
One land more next to William Henton. A Rood.
The land butting into Ragdale Sick near Dairynook between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior. A Rood.
One land in the same furlong between William Beby and James Pick. Half a Rood.
The little land under Coalpit Hill between William James and Thomas Henton junior. Half a Rood.
One land in the same furlong between James Pick and Thomas Henton junior a Rood.
Two lands upon Ding furlong between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior. Two Roods.
One land on the same furlong between William Henton and William Bebya Rood.
One land on the same furlong between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior a Rood.
One narrow land on the same furlong, William James on both sides. A Rood.
One long land going to Ragdale Barley Field Hedge between William James and James Pick. Half an Acre.
One land butting against Ragdale Barley field Hedge between William Henton and Thomas Henton Junior half an Acre.
One land against Coalpit Hill between Thomas Henton junior and William Beby. A Rood.
One Acre of land more against Coalpit Hill between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior.
One little land in the Cheesecake furlong between the said Hentons. A Quarter of a Rood, Now a Lay.
One land on the far side of Brewsters Close between the said Hentons. A Rood.
One land upon the little Breants between the said Hentons. A Rood.
Two lands upon Nick a cook Wong between the said Hentons. Two Roods.

 Arable Lands in the Goss Fields (Shooting?) into Brock Hill Gate

One land butting into Goss Sick between William James and William Henton. A Rood.
Two lands on the same furlong Thomas Henton Junior North William Henton South a Rood.
Two lands on the same furlong between the said Hentons. An Acre.
One long land between William Bate and James Pick. A Rood
One land, James Pick on both sides. A Rood.
One broad land between the said Hentons. A Rood.
One other land between William Henton and William Beby. A Rood.

The Upper Side Cowgate Hades

One land between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior
One land butting to William James Headland (……………………………….?)
Between the said Hentons. Half an Acre.
One land on the nether side Cowgate Hades between William James and William Beby. Better than Half a Rood.
One land lying down in the same furlong between the Hentons a Rood.
One land in the Reads between the said Hentons a Rood.
One land upon Marks or Morgan(?) Hill between William Beby and William Henton. A Rood.
Two lands more on the same furlong between Thomas Henton junior and James Pick. Three Roods.
Two lands under Constable Hades between William Henton and Thomas Henton junior. Two Roods.
One more on the same furlong between Thomas Henton junior and William Beby. A Rood.
One land butting up to Constable Hades near the gateway baulk going to the Goss between William Beby and James Pick. A Rood.
Two lands on long Hose between William and Thomas Henton junior. Three Roods.
One land on the top of short Hose between William Henton and William Beby. A Rood.
Two lands upon short Hose between William Beby and Thomas Henton junior. Two Roods.
Two lands upon Upper Dought Hill between William Henton and Thomas Henton Junior. An acre.
Two land upon the Nether Dought Hill between the said Hentons. Two Roods.
One land beyond Alderson Close between Thomas Henton. A Rood.
One land butting into Moorsbeck between Thomas Henton junior and William Beeby. Half a Rood.
One land butting into the Goss between the said Hentons. Half an acre.

 Arable land in the Sands Field next Austrean

One land butting into Moorsbeck between William Henton and James Beby. Half an acre.
One land butting to Matthew Kings Ha…………………between………..………….(?)
And Thomas Henton junior. A Rood and something more.
Two lands jutting towards Austrean between the said Hentons. Two Roods.
A headland and its fellow next to short stones. Two Roods.
Two lands in Fulhill Mi?es between the said Hentons a Rood
Two lands near the Round Hole between the said Hentons Two Roods.

Arable, Now Lay Lands in Henhouse

One Lay between William James and William Henton. Two Roods.
One Lay between William and Thomas Henton junior. Two Roods.
One Lay between William Henton. Half an Acre.

Close

A Close called the Parsons containing six Acres.
Meadow Ground in a Meadow belonging to Thomas Kington
One Piver joining to Oxbank Ditch about three Roods lying next William Arlington’s Piver.
One Piver near the Mill called the Mill Piver, about one Rood lying between William Arlington and William Wells Esquire.
One Piver containing two Acres lying on the farside of the Meadow between Widow Fernelay and John Lewen.
For a fulling Mill and a small parcel of ground belonging to it the Rector receives six shillings and sixpence per annum.

This Terrar is to be given in by Order of Dr Reynolds, Bishop of Lincoln at his Triennial Visitation held at Melton Mowbray August the twenty second 1730 being first subscribed by the Rector, ChurchWardens and other substantial inhabitants.

Rob. Browne Rector,       John Beeby,     Will. James,     Thomas Henton,     William Henton
Church Wardens – James Pick,    William Beeby

Notes on the 1730 Hoby Terrier

1. Measures

At this time measures were still based on the hypothetical area that a team of eight oxen could plough in a day and were variable from area to area.
A ‘yardland’ was approximately thirty acres but could be less.
An ‘oxgang’ was half a yard land
A ‘rood’ was a quarter of an acre.
A ‘pole’ was 30 square yards

2. Terminology

‘Ley’ refers to grazing land. This had been considerably increased by enclosures in the 17th century. Many of Hoby’s hedges date from the 1630’s and earlier when animal husbandry had become much more profitable than arable farming. The ‘New Field’ was enclosed from common grazing land in the 1500’s. ‘Wongs’ are enclosed fields of an earlier date.

3. Open-Field Farming around Hoby

This terrier illustrates the old system of scattered land holdings shortly before it ended. There were four main arable fields to the north of Hoby- the Clay and Middle Clay Fields, the Middle Field and the Goss Fields plus the smaller Sand Field to the south (see plan). Each year at least one of these fields was left fallow as crops were rotated. All were subdivided into smaller units called ‘furlongs’ which could be cultivated with a single crop. Within the furlong the land was divided into strips formed by the action of the plough into rig and furrow. The exact length of each strip or ‘land’ varied according to the topography. Villagers had their strips scattered around the parish for fairness.
Between strips there were sometimes baulks called ‘Hades’, carefully noted in the terrier and between furlongs there were usually headlands on which the plough could turn.…These could be used as grazing areas in addition to the common land east of Hoby.
There were three main areas of meadow used for growing hay – all close to the river or Austen Dyke – areas which flooded seasonally.
Hedges were rare except when land was permanently enclosed for grazing as around the New Field or parish boundaries.
The Church in 1730 still had a multitude of small land holdings scattered around the parish.

 4. Spelling and Syntax

I have generally kept to the original spelling except in simplifying ‘ff’ to ‘f’ and modernising the spelling of a few words eg Terrar‘ to Terrier and ‘plow’ to plough. I have added a little punctuation but kept the original initial capitals.